Banner with Harriet Tumban image and text reading Antislavery in the United States 1776-1865: a pathfinder by Tim the History Nut. Photo from Library of Congress</a> collections.

This portal lists various online, print, and manuscript sources pertaining to antislavery sentiment in the United States 1776 to 1865. The Underground Railroad is included in this topic since such activities were a form of ending slavery.


Site Contents

Against Slavery: An Abolitionist Reader. Edited by Mason Lowance.
New York: Penguin Putnam, 2000.
This resource contains various articles/essays by those opposing slavery in the United States. Also included are Acts of Congress, such as a the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 and the Wilmot Proviso of 1847. See the book’s Suggestions for Further Reading for an excellent list of resources about this topic.

Drescher, Seymour. Abolition: A history of slavery and antislavery..
New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009.
An academic Western world overview of slavery, with information about the United States abolition movement.

Encyclopedia of African American History, 1619-1895 : from the colonial period to the age of Frederick Douglass. Paul Finkelman, Editor in Chief.
New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.
This three volume set is a good first step for novices beginning their research on antislavery in the United States. Entries provide an introduction to the topic with references providing sources for additional research. Contents of main entries are listed in first volume with index in third volume.

Encyclopedia of Antislavery and Abolition. Edited by Peter Hinks and John McKivigan.
Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2007.

Encyclopedia of Emancipation and Abolition in the Transatlantic World. Edited by Junius Rodriguez.
Armonk, NY: Sharpe Reference, 2007.

Gates, Henry Louis, and J.A. Rogers. 100 amazing facts about the Negro.
New York: Pantheon Books, 2017.
Joel A. Rogers published in 1934 100 Amazing Facts About the Negro With Complete Proof: A Short Cut to the World History of the Negro. Gates updated Roger’s work, presenting it as a question and answer format. Questions and answers about abolitionists, slavery, and The Underground Railroad are provided.

Kaplan, Fred M. .
New York : HarperCollins, 2017.

Miller, William Lee. Arguing about Slavery: The Great Battle in the United States Congress.
New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1996.
Note: Also published as Arguing about Slavery: John Quincy Adams and the Great Battle in the United States Congress.
This title focuses on Congressional activities relating to slavery from 1835-1845. The reception of antislavery petitions by Congress infuriated slave state politicians. They used a gag rule to prevent such petitions from being discussed in the House of Representatives. However, Representative John Quincy Adams led the effort to eliminate the gag rule. He succeeded, but it took great effort to defeat this measure. Other men assisting Adams are Joshua Giddings, William Slade, and Theodore Weld.

Arguing about Slavery provides not only a narrative of activities in Congress, but also provides background information about the antislavery movement in the 1830s and 1840s. The Appendix contains a brief chronology of congressional events related to the gag rule. The Notes are a bit skimpy. There is a bibliography providing sources related to the topic. Overall, Arguing about Slavery is a good source to consult.

Schneider, Dorothy and Schneider, Carl J. Slavery in America: From Colonial Times to the Civil War: An Eyewitness History.
New York: Facts on File, 2000.
This source is a good introduction to the topic. Each chapter provides The Historical Context, Chronicle of Events, and Eyewitness Testimony. Some highlights of the book regarding antislavery include Chapter 10: The Argument over Slavery 1637-1865. Appendix A contains primary documents. Appendix B contains a one paragraph biography of people involved in the topic and an excellent Bibliography.

Sherburne, Michelle Arnosky. Slavery & the Underground Railroad in New Hampshire.
Charleston, S.C. : The History Press, 2016.
A quick read focusing on New Hampshire. The 1779 Slaves Petition is covered in Part I of this book. Part III covers the abolition movement.

Sinha, Manisha. The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition.
New Haven, CT. : Yale University Press, 2016.
This work is the new standard for the topic. The author meticulously researched the abolition cause in the United States from colonial times to The Civil War. Footnote chasers will find the Notes very useful in locating primary sources. A must-read.

Von Frank, Albert J. The trials of Anthony Burns: Freedom and slavery in Emerson’s Boston.
Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998.

Anti-Slavery Bugle (New Lisbon, OH) 1845-1861.
The Western Anti-Slavery Society published this newspaper.

Douglass’ Monthly (Rochester, NY) 1859-1863.
A monthly paper by Frederick Douglas.

Frederick Douglass’ Paper (Rochester, NY) 1851-1860.
Frederick Douglass changed the North Star to this name in 1851.

Genius of Universal Emancipation (Mount Pleasant, OH; Greenville, TN; Washington, DC; Baltimore, MD) 1821-1830.
Benjamin Lundy’s antislavery newspaper in which William Lloyd Garrison served as assistant editor from 1829-1830 in Baltimore.

The Liberator (Boston, MA) 1831-1865.
The infamous newspaper started by William Lloyd Garrison to persuade the public to oppose slavery.

National Anti-Slavery Standard (New York, NY) 1840-1870.
This paper is billed as the official organ of the American Anti-Slavery Society.

National Enquirer, and Constitutional Advocate of Universal Liberty (New York, NY) 1836-1838.
Benjamin Lundy published this paper for the Eastern District Executive Committee of the Anti-Slavery Society of Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania Freeman continues the title.

North Star (Rochester, NY) 1847-1851.
The first paper started by Frederick Douglass to give himself a separate voice from the Garrisonians.

Pennsylvania Freeman (Philadelphia, PA) 1838-1854.
The Eastern District Executive Committee of the Anti-Slavery Society of Pennsylvania published this newspaper.

The Abolition of the Slave Trade
This website contains primary and secondary sources pertaining to the elimination of the international slave trade. The New York Public Library Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture maintains this resource.

The Abolitionists - PBS American Experience
This PBS film summarizes the antislavery movement with focus on Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Harriet Beecher Stowe, John Brown and Angelina Grimké. See the Related Books and Websites page for additional resources on the topic. The Abolitionist Map of America is an interactive map that provides info about the movement in communities throughout America.

African American Perspectives - Pamphlets from the Daniel A. P. Murray Collection 1818 - 1907 at the Library of Congress
This digital library of African American pamphlets includes antislavery pamphlets such as the Thirteenth annual report presented to the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society of 22 January 1845. Site can be searched by keywords, or one may browse the author and/or the subject index.

Africans in America
PBS web site on slavery in the US. This site is a narrative on the subject arranged in a timeline format.

American Abolitionism
This site, which no longer appears to be updated, contains information about the abolition movement in the United States. This source contains background information, brief biographies of abolitionists, links to online documents, a bibliography, and a listing of officers for the major antislavery societies.

The Antislavery Literature Project
This digital archive contains historical and contemporary accounts of slavery. One will find a wealth of material regarding slavery in the United States. This collection has poetry, fiction (adult and children), tracts, and travel accounts, all describing slavery. This site is maintained by the English Department of Arizona State University and the EServer at Iowa State University’s English Department.

The Black Abolitionist Archive
The University of Detroit Mercy Libraries/IDS maintains this digital library containing speeches and editorials from black abolitionists.

The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed
A good starting point for locating information about people involved in the antislavery movement. Links to other resources/websites are also included.

Carr, Glynis. Index to The Liberty Bell.
The Liberty Bell is an American Anti-Slavery publication containing essays and poetry from various abolitionists.

A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: US Congressional Documents and Debates 1774-1875
This Library of Congress website allows one to search Congressional documents for the years 1774-1875. This source is useful in locating antislavery petitions to Congress and the actions of individual Congressmen in regards to slavery.

Digital Public Library of America
A platform for archives, historical societies, libraries, museums, and other cultural institutions to share their content with Internet users. One may locate resources pertaining to antislavery, abolitionists, and/or individuals.

Documenting the American South
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries maintains this website containing resources pertaining to the South. Included in this collection are digitized books and pamphlets regarding slavery, the antislavery movement, runaway slaves, and the Underground Railroad.

From Slavery to Freedom: The African-American Pamphlet Collection
This digital collection from the Library of Congress complements the African American Perspectives listed above and contains primary resources pertaining to slavery and antislavery.

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition
This resource lists online primary sources pertaining to slavery. Included are speeches and correspondence of individuals regarding their thoughts about slavery.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. The amount of antislavery material is extensive. I recommend searching this site if you have narrowed your research to a specific event/person/publication.

Historical Society of Pennsylvania
One may search the Society’s Online Catalogs for items pertaining to slavery and the antislavery movement in Pennsylvania. Also see the Society’s History Online page for collections pertaining to the abolition and antislavery movements.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online antislavery documents. The amount of antislavery material is extensive. I recommend searching this site if you have narrowed your research to a specific event/person/publication.

Maine Memory Network
Created by the Maine Historical Society, this site provides digitized items from the Society and other Maine organizations related to slavery. The following online exhibits also provide information about the Pine Tree State’s attitudes towards slavery:
Slavery’s Defenders and Foes
Blacks in Maine
William Ladd, the Apostle of Peace

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary and secondary sources from 1850 to 1877. A good amount of material pertaining to antislavery sentiment, fugitive slaves, and the Civil War can be found in this site. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time, but also contains the War of the Rebellion series. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

Massachusetts Historical Society
Below are several MHS resources highlighting the Bay State’s role in the antislavery movement:
African Americans and the End of Slavery in Massachusetts
Boston Abolitionists, 1831-1865
The Case for Ending Slavery
Images of the Antislavery Movement in Massachusetts
Long Road to Justice

Nantucket Historical Association Research Library
One may search the NHA Research Library’s collection for items pertaining to slavery and the antislavery movement in Nantucket.

The National Archives and Records Administration
The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) contains various documents pertaining to slavery. Their website includes images of The District of Columbia Emancipation Act, Emancipation Proclamation, and The 13th Amendment. You may also access their Records about Slavery site. Also see their Getting Started and Research our Records pages for more information about researching this topic at NARA facilities.

primaryresearch.org
Primary Research is an organization that allows Beverly Massachusetts High School students to research local history. Various historical societies and libraries of Greater Boston are involved in this project, which makes various primary sources of Massachusetts history available to all. Include in this site is African Americans in Antebellum Boston, a portal to primary sources on this topic, including antislavery materials. Primary Documents also includes Selected Articles from the Liberator, William Lloyd Garrison’s antislavery newspaper. The articles selected pertain to African-American and white Bostonian voluntary antislavery associations for the years 1831-1855. These selected articles can be searched by keyword, or one may browse the Liberator by year, topic, or by name.

Quest for Freedom - The Philadelphia History Museum
The Philadelphia History Museum provides an overview of slavery and antislavery in Philadelphia through a narrative involving 14 objects. A listing of relevant historical markers within the City is located at the bottom of the Quest for Freedom page.

The Revised Dred Scott Case Collection
The Washington University Digital Gateway maintains this website containing records of the Dred Scott litigation that began in 1846 when Dred and Harriett Scott sued for their freedom. Their quest for freedom by legal means ended with the controversial 1858 Supreme Court decision. A Chronology and History of the Dred Scott Case are included, as are links to additional resources.

St. Louis Circuit Court Historical Records Project - Freedom Suits Case Files, 1814-1860
Search this site for 301 cases involving slaves suing their owners for freedom. These cases were filed between 1814 and 1860 in St. Louis Missouri. Check out the Resources page for additional items about freedom suits and petitions.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets.

Slavery & Abolition in the US: Select Publications of the 1800s
This digital library contains books and pamphlets regarding slavery during the 1800s. Items in this online collection are from the Archives and Special Collections Departments of both the Millersville University Library and the Dickinson College Library. One may search or browse this resource.

UMass Amherst DuBois Library - SCUA - Antislavery Pamphlets
This digital library contains pamphlets that demonstrate the various points of view New Englanders had regarding slavery from the Revolution to the Civil War. This excellent resource is maintained by the University of Massachusetts Amherst DuBois Library Special Collections and University Archives [SCUA].

Uncle Tom’s Cabin & American Culture
This Digital Library takes a unique look at the US attitudes towards African Americans before Uncle Tom’s Cabin was published, and the response of Americans to this work. One may search the site and locate primary sources pertaining to antislavery sentiment. This site is a joint-venture between the University of Virginia and the Harriett Beecher Stowe Center of Hartford CT.

American Antiquarian Society - Worcester, Massachusetts
This closed-stack library is a great source for antislavery materials. Antislavery research at AAS can be conducted by using the Society’s collections of biographies, US and local histories, newspapers, manuscripts, almanacs, broadsides, and pamphlets. One may search the AAS collection online using their catalog, but note that not all collections are in the online catalog. Please contact AAS for more information about their collections. Please also view their Planning Your Visit page.

Boston Public Library - Boston, Massachusetts
The BPL has the Anti-Slavery collection, which consists mostly of William Lloyd Garrison’s papers. This collection also has various documents, books, and pamphlets, as well as the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society papers. The Broadside Collection contains broadsides regarding antislavery and the Fugitive Slave Law. The BPL also houses the collection of Theodore Parker. This library has a large amount of newspapers for the period and the subject. A large amount of books on the antislavery movement and the Underground Railroad are also available at the BPL. One may check their online catalog but one should also contact the library for assistance, since most of their pre-1974 collection is not in the online catalog. A large amount of the collections at the BPL do not circulate so be prepared to spend time at the library.

Connecticut Historical Society Museum and Library - Hartford, Connecticut
The Connecticut Historical Society has numerous autobiographies of former slaves, letters, manumission documents, antislavery posters, military enlistment documents for enslaved soldiers, and other materials. See their African American Resources at the CHS page, and search their Catalog for sources relevant to Connecticut antislavery.

Historic Northampton Museum & Education Center - Northampton, Massachusetts
The Museum’s Reference Shelf contains a listing of Northampton history sources, including a listing of sources pertaining to slavery and the antislavery movement in Northampton. The site also has links to other sources and organizations relevant to Northampton history. Please contact the Museum for information regarding their manuscript and pamphlet collections, and to make an appointment to view the collections.

Historical Society of Pennsylvania - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
One may search the Society’s Online Catalogs for items pertaining to slavery and the antislavery movement in Pennsylvania. Also see the Society’s History Online page for collections pertaining to the abolition and antislavery movements. See their Plan Your Visit page should your research needs require using their collection.

Library of Congress - Washington DC
The Library of Congress is the research library for American History. The LOC possesses a wealth of secondary sources and primary sources pertaining to slavery, antislavery, and The Underground Railroad. Check the Library Catalog for items available at the LOC. See the Researchers page for information about using the LOC collections.

Maine Historical Society: The Brown Library - Portland, Maine
See the Search the Library Catalog page to locate items relevant to antislavery sentiments in Maine.

Maryland State Archives - Annapolis, Maryland
One may use either the Search the Archives, The Study of the Legacy of Slavery in Maryland, or the Beneath the Underground: The Flight to Freedom features to locate resources. See the About the Archives page for info about visiting the MSA.

Massachusetts Historical Society Library - Boston, Massachusetts
This closed-stack library contains various books, broadsides, pamphlets, newspapers, photographs, and manuscripts pertaining to slavery, the antislavery movement, as well as the Underground Railroad. One may view ABIGAL, the online catalog of the MHS. Not all materials are listed in ABIGAL, so please contact a reference librarian for further assistance. Please read the Visiting the Library page before going to MHS.

Nantucket Historical Association Research Library - Nantucket, Massachusetts
The NHA’s Research Library contains numerous manuscript collections that have sources relevant to antislavery. Search the manuscript online catalog using the term “slavery.” Please note that the library charges a fee to non-members for use of its collections.

The National Archives and Records Administration - Washington DC
The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) contain various documents pertaining to slavery. Their website includes Records about Slavery. Also see their Getting Started Overview and Research our Records pages for more information about researching this topic at NARA facilities.

Oberlin College Library Anti-Slavery Collection - Oberlin, Ohio
From its start in 1833, Oberlin supported the antislavery cause. The Anti-Slavery collection has about 2500 items, most of which may be located in OBIS, the Library’s online catalog.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection - Cornell University - Ithaca, New York
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this collection of antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets.

Slavery and Antislavery Resources (George J. Mitchell Department of Special Collections and Archives - Bowdoin College - Brunswick, Maine
This page highlights some of the primary resources available at the Bowdoin College George J. Mitchell Department of Special Collections & Archives.

Southern Historical Collection at the Wilson Library - University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
One of the SHC’s subject strengths is slavery. Check the Search Our Collections page for items about slavery, antislavery, and runaway slaves. Please view the Use Wilson Library page before visiting UNC.

Vermont Historical Society - Barre, Vermont
Get started with the Research Resources Online page. See also The Underground Railroad Project.

Click on the person’s name you’re researching. Names are arranged in alphabetical order by last name. More names will be gradually added.

Duberman, Martin. Charles Francis Adams 1807-1886.
Stanford CA : Stanford University Press, 1960.
This biography covers the personal and professional life of Adams, including his involvement in the slavery debate.

ADAMS, Charles Francis - Biographical Information
This page contains a brief bio about Adams taken from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Check out the Research Collections for a listing of relevant archival resources.

The Adams Family Resources
The Massachusetts Historical Society is the center for Adams Family primary sources. This website contains finding aids for the Adams Family Papers, Biographical Sketches, the Adams Timeline, the Adams Family Tree, as well as other useful resources.

A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: US Congressional Documents and Debates 1774-1875
This Library of Congress website allows one to search Congressional documents for the years 1774-1875. This source is useful in locating antislavery petitions to Congress and the actions of individual Congressmen, such as Charles Francis Adams, in regards to slavery.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about Charles Francis Adams, and anti-slavery items authored by Adams.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online antislavery documents, including a few authored by Charles Francis Adams.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets authored by Charles Francis Adams.

Kaplan, Fred M. .
New York : HarperCollins, 2017.

Miller, William Lee. Arguing about Slavery: The Great Battle in the United States Congress.
New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1996.
Note: Also published as Arguing about Slavery: John Quincy Adams and the Great Battle in the United States Congress.
This title focuses on Congressional activities relating to slavery from 1835-1845. The reception of antislavery petitions by Congress infuriated slave state politicians. They used a gag rule to prevent such petitions from being discussed in the House of Representatives. However, Representative John Quincy Adams led the effort to eliminate the gag rule. He succeeded, but it took great effort to defeat this measure. Other men assisting Adams are Joshua Giddings, William Slade, and Theodore Weld.

Arguing about Slavery provides not only a narrative of activities in Congress, but also provides background information about the antislavery movement in the 1830s and 1840s. The Appendix contains a brief chronology of congressional events related to the gag rule. The Notes are a bit skimpy. There is a bibliography providing sources related to the topic. Overall, Arguing about Slavery is a good source to consult regarding Adam’s role in preserving the right of citizens to submit antislavery petitions to Congress.

Sinha, Manisha. The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition.
New Haven, CT. : Yale University Press, 2016.
The author meticulously researched the abolition cause in the United States from colonial times to The Civil War. Footnote chasers will find the Notes very useful in locating primary sources. Use the Index to locate information about John Quincy Adams.

The Adams Family Resources
The Massachusetts Historical Society is the center for Adams Family primary sources. This website contains finding aids for the Adams Family Papers, The Diaries of John Quincy Adams, Biographical Sketches, the Adams Family Tree, the Adams Timeline, as well as other useful resources.

Amistad: The Federal Courts and the Challenge to Slavery
An excellent introduction to the Amistad case and John Quincy Adam’s involvement in the matter. You’ll find historical background information and documents related to the topic. This site was created and is maintained by the Federal Judicial Center, the education and research agency for the United States Federal Courts.

A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: US Congressional Documents and Debates 1774-1875
This Library of Congress website allows one to search Congressional documents for the years 1774-1875. This source is useful in locating antislavery petitions to Congress and the actions of individual Congressmen, such as John Quincy Adams, in regards to slavery.

CivilWar@Smithsonian
The CivilWar@Smithsonian website highlights Smithsonian items pertaining to Civil War history. This website provides some information about the former President’s attempts in Congress to fight the pro-slavery forces. Below are links to the site’s contents covering Adams:

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition
This resource lists online primary sources pertaining to slavery. Included are speeches and correspondence of individuals, including John Quincy Adams.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about antislavery petitions and John Quincy Adams.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online documents by or about John Quincy Adams.

John Quincy Adams Biography
This four-page web biography gives a good introduction to the life of John Quincy Adams. After losing his bid for a second term for the US Presidency, John Quincy Adams served Massachusetts in the House of Representatives from 1831 up to his death in 1848. This biography authored by Adams National Historical Park (U.S. National Park Service).

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets authored by John Quincy Adams.

The Life and Sufferings of Leonard Black, a Fugitive from Slavery. Written by Himself
Leonard Black describes his experience as a slave, as well as his escape from slavery. This resource is part of the Documenting the American South collection.

Carton, Evan. Patriotic Treason: John Brown and the Soul of America.
New York: Free Press, 2006.
This source provides a decent biography of John Brown. The Source Notes appear to lack citations of all the sources used by the author. This book also lacks a bibliography. Overall, Patriotic Treason is an ideal source for the general reader looking for just John Brown’s story.

Gates, Henry Louis, and J.A. Rogers. 100 amazing facts about the Negro.
New York: Pantheon Books, 2017.
Joel A. Rogers published in 1934 100 Amazing Facts About the Negro With Complete Proof: A Short Cut to the World History of the Negro. Gates updated Roger’s work, presenting it as a question and answer format. A brief explanation of Harpers Ferry is provided.

Address of John Brown to the Virginia Court, When about to Receive the Sentence of Death . . .
This broadside containing Brown’s statement is part of the Library of Congress African American Odyssey exhibit.

African American Perspectives - Pamphlets from the Daniel A. P. Murray Collection 1818 - 1907 at the Library of Congress
This digital library of African American pamphlets includes antislavery pamphlets about John Brown. Site can be searched by keywords, or one may browse the author and/or the subject index.

The American Experience - John Brown’s Holy War
This website is a companion to the PBS American Experience film of the same name. This site provides a good overview of John Brown by providing brief info about his life, other personalities tied to Brown, maps, a timeline, and a teacher’s guide.

The Antislavery Literature Project
This digital archive contains historical and contemporary accounts of slavery. One will find material pertaining to John Brown. This site is maintained by the English Department of Arizona State University and the EServer at Iowa State University’s English Department.

Correspondence between Lydia Maria Child and Gov. Wise and Mrs. Mason, of Virginia
This American Anti-Slavery Tract contains a heated exchange of letters between Lydia Maria Child, Governor Wise of Virginia, and a Mrs. Mason of Alto, Virginia regarding John Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry. Also included is correspondence between Child and Brown. This document is part of the African-American Perspectives Pamphlets of the Library of Congress.

Digital Public Library of America
A platform for archives, historical societies, libraries, museums, and other cultural institutions to share their content with Internet users. Use DPLA to locate resources pertaining to John Brown.

From Slavery to Freedom: The African-American Pamphlet Collection
This digital collection from the Library of Congress complements the African American Perspectives listed above and contains material about John Brown.

Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
This page, maintained by the National Parks Service, provides a brief description of the Harpers Ferry raid.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about John Brown.

“His Soul Goes Marching On” The Life and Legacy of John Brown
This online exhibit, created by the West Virginia Archives and History, provides a very good introduction to John Brown and the Harpers Ferry raid. Primary sources and images are included in this site.

John Brown
This page, part of the PBS Africans in America website, provides a brief biography of Brown with links to other pages within this website containing information about the Harpers Ferry raid.

John Brown/Boyd B. Stutler Collection Database
This online database, maintained by the West Virginia Archives and History, contains letters and photographs that may be viewed online.

The John Brown Homepage
In this site, you’ll find brief biographical info about Brown, eyewitness and newspaper account of the Harpers Ferry insurrection, images, and a listing of recommended sources. This page is part of the University of Virginia Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities project.

The Liberator Files
This site maintained by Horace Sheldon contains articles from The Liberator, including many about John Brown.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary sources from 1850 to 1877. Items pertaining to John Brown are available. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets about John Brown.

Slaves and the Courts 1740-1860
This digital library is part of the Library of Congress American Memory project. The collection contains full texts of books and pamphlets on the legal issues of slavery. The Life, Trial, and Execution of Captain John Brown is available through this resource.

Territorial Kansas Online - Biographical Sketch - John Brown
This website provides a brief bio of Brown, focusing on his time in Kansas. A listing of additional sources is provided, plus digitized documents from the Territorial Kansas Online virtual repository.

Von Frank, Albert J. The trials of Anthony Burns: Freedom and slavery in Emerson’s Boston.
Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998.

Anthony Burns: A History. by Charles Emery Stevens.
Documenting the American South has made this account of Anthony Burns, published in 1856, available in full text.

The Anthony Burns Affair
A great paper by Karen Livingood about Anthony Burns, his arrest in Boston, his trial, and his freedom.

The Antislavery Literature Project
This digital archive contains historical and contemporary accounts of slavery. Speeches and pamphlets pertaining to Anthony Burns are included in this collection. This site is maintained by the English Department of Arizona State University and the EServer at Iowa State University’s English Department.

Boston Slave Riot, and Trial of Anthony Burns
This site contains primary documents covering the capture of Anthony Burns in Boston. This site is part of the American Memory Slave and the Courts 1740-1860 digital archive maintained by the Library of Congress.

Burns, Anthony (1834-1862): The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed
A good introduction to Anthony Burns.

Influence of Prominent Abolitionists: The African-American Mosaic (Library of Congress Exhibition)
Here you’ll find a broadside of Anthony Burns.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online antislavery documents, including those about Anthony Burns.

The Liberator Files
This site maintained by Horace Sheldon contains articles about Anthony Burns from The Liberator.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary sources from 1850 to 1877. A good amount of material pertaining to antislavery sentiment, fugitive slaves, and the Civil War can be found in this site. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs. Numerous documents available within MOA contain information about Anthony Burns.

Mass Moments: Fugitive Slave Anthony Burns Arrested
A secondary web resource explaining the significance of Anthony Burns. Other resources pertaining to Burns are listed in this page.

PBS Africans in America
In Anthony Burns Captured, you’ll find a brief biography of Anthony Burns. Burns escaped from slavery but The Fugitive Slave Act forced him back into enslavement, causing a great uproar. Anthony Burns Speaks contains an account of his capture.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets pertaining to Anthony Burns.

Carr, Glynis. Index to The Liberty Bell.
The Liberty Bell is an American Anti-Slavery publication containing essays and poetry from various abolitionists, including Maria Weston Chapman.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about Maria Weston Chapman.

“How Can I Help Abolish Slavery?” or, Counsels to the Newly Converted
by Maria Weston Chapman

This 1855 recruiting pamphlet is part of the Anti-Slavery Tract series. The Antislavery Literature Project digitized this pamphlet, and others by Maria Weston Chapman.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online antislavery documents, including a few by Maria Weston Chapman.

The Liberator Files
This site maintained by Horace Sheldon contains articles from The Liberator, including several authored by or about Maria Weston Chapman.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary and secondary sources from 1850 to 1877. Some documents pertaining to Maria Weston Chapman are available. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

Maria Weston Chapman and the Weston Sisters
Provides an overview of Chapman’s life and involvement in antislavery societies. Sources for further study are contained at the bottom. Joan Goodwin authored this biography for the Dictionary of Unitarian and Universalist Biography

Pinda: A True Tale
by Maria Weston Chapman

Stating that this story is 100% true is a bit misleading, but there are some truths in this pamphlet. The Antislavery Literature Project digitized this pamphlet, and others by Maria Weston Chapman.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets authored by Maria Weston Chapman.

Child, Lydia Maria Franics. An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans.
Boston: Allen and Ticknor, 1833.
This work brought Child to the forefront of the antislavery cause at the expense of her flourishing literary career.

National Anti-Slavery Standard (New York, NY) 1840-1870.
This paper is billed as the official organ of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Child edited this newspaper from 1841 to 1843.

The Antislavery Literature Project
This digital archive contains historical and contemporary accounts of slavery. One will find a wealth of material by or about Lydia Maria Child. This site is maintained by the English Department of Arizona State University and the EServer at Iowa State University’s English Department.

Child, Lydia Maria. “Slavery’s Pleasant Homes” and Other Writings from The Liberty Bell.
This site contains several items authored by Child. Part of The Online Archive of Nineteenth-Century U.S. Women’s Writings, edited by Glynis Carr.

Correspondence between Lydia Maria Child and Gov. Wise and Mrs. Mason, of Virginia
This American Anti-Slavery Tract contains a heated exchange of letters between Lydia Maria Child, Governor Wise of Virginia, and a Mrs. Mason of Alto, Virginia regarding John Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry. Also included is correspondence between Child and Brown. This document is part of the African-American Perspectives Pamphlets of the Library of Congress.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about Lydia Maria Child.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online documents by or about Lydia Maria Child.

The Liberator Files
This site maintained by Horace Sheldon contains articles from The Liberator, including several authored by or about Lydia Maria Child.

Lydia Maria Francis Child Papers
This page provides information regarding to the Child Papers at the William L. Clements Library of the University of Michigan. A brief biography may also be accessed via this page.

Lydia Maria Child
Provides an overview of Child’s life and involvement in antislavery societies. Sources for further study are contained at the bottom. Joan Goodwin authored this biography for the Dictionary of Unitarian and Universalist Biography

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary and secondary sources from 1850 to 1877. Materials pertaining to Lydia Maria Child are available. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

The Patriarchal Institution, as Described by Members of its Own Family. Comp. by L. Maria Child
This pamphlet, published in 1860 by the American Anti-Slavery Society, contains a listing of quotes regarding slavery. Part of the Library of Congress From Slavery to Freedom: The African-American Pamphlet Collection, 1822-1909.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets authored by Lydia Maria Child.

WWHP - Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880)
The Worcester Women’s History Project created this brief biography about Child.

Douglass, Frederick. Life and Times of Frederick Douglass.
Hartford, Conn: Park Publishing Co., 1881. Various editions are available. See below for online texts.
The final autobiography of Frederick Douglass.

Douglass, Frederick. My Bondage and My Freedom.
New York; Auburn [NY]: Miller, Orton & Mulligan, 1855. Various editions are available. See below for online texts.
Douglass wrote this item ten years after Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass to provide additional information about his life and slavery.

Douglass, Frederick. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself
Boston: Anti-Slavery Office, 1845. Various editions are available. See below for online texts.
The first written work by Douglass about his life as a slave.

Gates, Henry Louis, and J.A. Rogers. 100 amazing facts about the Negro.
New York: Pantheon Books, 2017.
Joel A. Rogers published in 1934 100 Amazing Facts About the Negro With Complete Proof: A Short Cut to the World History of the Negro. Gates updated Roger’s work, presenting it as a question and answer format. Some information about Frederick Douglass is provided.

McFeely, William S. Frederick Douglass.
New York: Norton, 1991.
Freudian interpretations by the authors are a bit overblown. Despite this flaw, the book is a good secondary source about Douglass. Frederick Douglass contains an excellent bibliography listing primary and secondary sources.

Douglass’ Monthly (Rochester, NY) 1859-1863.

Frederick Douglass’ Paper (Rochester, NY) 1851-1860.
Douglass changed the North Star to this name in 1851.

North Star (Rochester, NY) 1847-51.
The first paper started by Douglass to give himself a separate voice from the Garrisonians.

Addresses of the Hon. W. D. Kelley, Miss Anna E. Dickinson, and Mr. Frederick Douglass, at a mass meeting ...
This digitized pamphlet contains a 6 July 1863 Philadelphia speech by Douglass promoting the enlistment of black troops in what he viewed as a fight against slavery. This resource is part of the Library of Congress From Slavery to Freedom: The African-American Pamphlet Collection.

The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed
A good starting point for locating information about people involved in the antislavery movement, including Frederick Douglass. Links to other resources/websites are also included.

Carr, Glynis. Index to The Liberty Bell.
The Liberty Bell is an American Anti-Slavery publication containing essays and poetry from various abolitionists, including Frederick Douglass.

CivilWar@Smithsonian
The CivilWar@Smithsonian website highlights Smithsonian items pertaining to Civil War history. This website briefly covers Douglass’s involvement in the abolition movement. Below are links to two pieces of art with Douglass as the subject:

The Claims of the Negro, Ethnologically Considered . . .
Full text of a speech given 12 July 1854 at Western Reserve College. This resource is part of the Library of Congress From Slavery to Freedom: The African-American Pamphlet Collection.

Documenting the American South
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries maintains this website containing resources pertaining to the South. Included in this collection are Frederick Douglass materials. The site contains a brief biography and Selected Readings Related to Frederick Douglass. Both pages lead to online texts written by Douglass and a few full text biographies written in the late 19th Century.

Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Congress
7,400 online documents are available to view. A guide to the collection is also available.

Free church alliance with manstealers. Send back the money. Great anti-slavery meeting in the City Hall, Glasgow . . .
This digitized pamphlet contains a 1846 speech given by Douglass in Scotland blasting the Free Church of Scotland for their acceptance of funds from American slaveholders. This resource is another item available from the Library of Congress From Slavery to Freedom: The African-American Pamphlet Collection.

Gilder Lehrman Center Bibliography of Online Documents
This resource lists online primary sources pertaining to slavery. Included are speeches and correspondence of Frederick Douglass.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Be prepared to be overwhelmed when locating items about Frederick Douglass via this resource. Narrow your search by focusing on a particular publication/topic regarding Douglass.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online antislavery documents, including those by and about Douglass. You will be overwhelmed by the search results unless you narrow your search by focusing on a particular publication/topic regarding Douglass.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary sources from 1850 to 1877. Some material pertaining to Douglass may be found in this site. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time, but also contains the War of the Rebellion series. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets by Frederick Douglass.

Speeches by Frederick Douglas
A portal to Douglass’s speeches available online. The site is authored by Lucia Knoles, Professor of English at Assumption College, Worcester, Massachusetts. Please pay heed to her advice on reading Frederick Douglass’s speeches listed on the web.

The Antislavery Literature Project
This digital archive contains historical and contemporary accounts of slavery. One will find a wealth of material regarding slavery in the United States, including materials authored by Emerson. This collection has poetry, fiction (adult and children), tracts, and travel accounts, all describing slavery. This site is maintained by the English Department of Arizona State University and the EServer at Iowa State University’s English Department.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about Emerson’s antislavery views.

Ralph Waldo Emerson 1803-1882 by Ann Woodlief
Woodlief presents a brief biography, links to other biographies, bibliographies, online texts, and other Emerson websites. This page is a good first start in researching Emerson. The article is part of the American Transcendentalism Web.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets authored by Emerson.

Foster, Abby Kelley. “What Hinders Us? An Item of Experience.” Liberty Bell (1858): 21-28.

Kelley, Abby. “What is Real Anti-Slavery Work?” Liberty Bell (1845): 202-208.

Sterling, Dorothy. Ahead of Her Time: Abby Kelley and the Politics of Antislavery.
New York: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1991
A thoroughly researched and well-written biography.

Carr, Glynis. Index to The Liberty Bell.
The Liberty Bell is an American Anti-Slavery publication containing essays and poetry from various abolitionists, including Abby Kelley.

Liberty Farm - NRHP Travel Itinerary
The Liberty Farm link contains a brief biography on Abby Kelley Foster and her home in Worcester, Massachusetts. This web page is part of the Places Where Women Made History site and authored by the National Park Service National Register of Historical Places.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary sources from 1850 to 1877. Some material pertaining to Abby Kelley may be found in this site. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets pertaining to Abby Kelley.

Worcester Women’s History Project
Although this page does not contain a biography of Abby Kelley Foster, it does contain information about Alla Paulina Wright Foster, Abby’s daughter. The page links to a Kelley Family Tree and a Foster Family Tree. Other links on this page provide biographical information on those involved in the antislavery movement.

Mayer, Henry. All on Fire: William Lloyd Garrison and the Abolition of Slavery.
New York: St. Martin Press, 1998
This work is the most recent biography published. Mayer’s fondness for Garrison is apparent in this book. The author admits his bias. However, All on Fire is a valuable secondary source for anyone interested in Garrison.

Genius of Universal Emancipation (Mount Pleasant, OH; Greenville, TN; Washington, DC; Baltimore, MD) 1821-1830.
Benjamin Lundy’s anti-slavery newspaper in which Garrison served as assistant editor from 1829-1830 in Baltimore.

The Liberator (Boston, MA) 1831-1865.
The infamous newspaper started by Garrison to persuade the public to oppose slavery.

The Antislavery Literature Project
This digital archive contains historical and contemporary accounts of slavery. One will find a wealth of material regarding slavery in the United States, including some authored by Garrison. This site is maintained by the English Department of Arizona State University and the EServer at Iowa State University’s English Department.

Carr, Glynis. Index to The Liberty Bell.
The Liberty Bell is an American Anti-Slavery publication containing essays and poetry from various abolitionists, including William Lloyd Garrison.

CivilWar@Smithsonian
The CivilWar@Smithsonian website highlights Smithsonian items pertaining to Civil War history. This website briefly covers William Lloyd Garrison’s involvement in the abolition movement. Below are links to four pieces of art with Garrison as the subject:

Fair Use Repository
Various Liberator articles authored by Garrison may be read in this website.

From Slavery to Freedom: The African-American Pamphlet Collection
This digital collection from the Library of Congress contains primary resources pertaining to slavery and antislavery. Several pamphlets authored by Garrison are available to view in full text.

Gilder Lehrman Center Bibliography of Online Documents
This resource lists online primary sources pertaining to slavery. Included are speeches and correspondence of individuals regarding their thoughts about slavery. Several letters written by Garrison have been transcribed and are available to read.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Be prepared to be overwhelmed when locating items about Frederick Douglass via this resource. Narrow your search by focusing on a particular publication/topic regarding Garrison.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online antislavery documents, including those by and about Douglass. You will be overwhelmed by the search results unless you narrow your search by focusing on a particular publication/topic regarding Garrison.

The Liberator Files
This site maintained by Horace Sheldon contains articles from The Liberator.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary and secondary sources from 1850 to 1877. A good amount of material pertaining to Garrison is available within MOA. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time, but also contains the War of the Rebellion series. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets authored by William Lloyd Garrison.

UMass Amherst DuBois Library - SCUA - Antislavery Pamphlets
This digital library contains pamphlets that demonstrate the various points of view New Englanders had regarding slavery from the Revolution to the Civil War. Included within this collection is An Address, Delivered Before the Free People of Color, in Philadelphia, New-York, and Other Cities, During the Month of June, 1831 by Garrison. This excellent resource is maintained by the University of Massachusetts Amherst DuBois Library Special Collections and University Archives [SCUA].

William Lloyd Garrison Papers
A guide to The Massachusetts Historical Society’s William Lloyd Garrison Papers 1833-1882, Microfilm Edition.

Appeal to the Christian women of the South, by A. E. Grimké
A pamphlet by Angelina Grimké published in 1836. This item is part of the Library of Congress From Slavery to Freedom: The African-American Pamphlet Collection, 1822-1909 digital archive.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about the Grimké sisters.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online antislavery documents, including a few by Angelina Grimké.

The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Grimké Sisters, by Catherine H. Birney
A biography originally published in 1885 available in HTML format thanks to Project Gutenberg.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets, including those by Angelina and Sarah Grimké.

Slavery and the Boston Riot
A digitized broadside of a letter written by Angelina Grimké to William Lloyd Garrison after his survival of the 1835 Boston Riot. This item is part of An American Time Capsule: Three Centuries of Broadsides and Other Printed Ephemera maintained by the Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of Congress.

Documenting the American South - About Thomas H. Jones
This biography provides links to primary documents and titles by Jones, such as The Experience and Personal Narrative of Uncle Tom Jones. Contents of this bio originally appeared in C. Peter Ripley et al., eds., The Black Abolitionist Papers, vol. 2, Canada, 1830-1865 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1986), 134-5.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about Jones.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online documents, including The Experience of Thomas H. Jones.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets, including The Experience of Thomas H. Jones.

Dunbar, Erica Armstrong. Never caught : the Washingtons’ relentless pursuit of their runaway slave, Ona Judge
New York : 37 Ink, 2017.
Narrative of Judge’s escape from the Washingtons’ enslavement to freedom in New Hampshire. Dunbar makes many guesses about Judge’s decisions and feelings due to the lack of primary sources available.

Ona Judge - George Washington’s Mount Vernon
A summary of Oney Judge's relationship with the Washington family and her escape. A bibliography is provided. This page is part of the George Washington Digital Encyclopedia.

Ona Marie Judge - Weeks Public Library
An excerpt from “A Pleasant Abiding Place: A History of Greenland, N.H., 1635-2000”, by Paul C. Hughes and Paul F. Hughes providing a summary of George Washington’s attempts to get Ona Judge back into enslavement. The Weeks Public Library of Greenland, New Hampshire maintains this page.

Kaplan, Fred M. .
New York : HarperCollins, 2017.
A chapter provides a biographical summary of Elijah Lovejoy.

Alton, Illinois - Civil War Era - Elijah Parish Lovejoy
A brief bio of Lovejoy along with an account of the 7 November 1837 Alton mob riot as reported by the Alton Observer.

The Antislavery Literature Project
This digital archive contains historical and contemporary accounts of slavery. One will find a wealth of material regarding slavery in the United States, including some about Lovejoy. This site is maintained by the English Department of Arizona State University and the EServer at Iowa State University’s English Department.

Colby College
Elijah Parish Lovejoy graduated from Colby College in 1826. The The Story of Elijah Parish Lovejoy page provides a brief bio of Lovejoy and the Colby College Lovejoy award. The Colby College Libraries Special Collections page provides a catalog search to use for locating Lovejoy materials within the collections.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about Elijah Lovejoy.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online documents about Lovejoy.

The Liberator Files
This site maintained by Horace Sheldon contains articles from William Lloyd Garrison’s The Liberator.

Lovejoy, Elijah Parish Papers, 1804-1891 and undated
The Texas Tech Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library provides a digital repository of Lovejoy papers and correspondence.

Today in History: November 7
This Library of Congress page provides an overview of Lovejoy’s murder by a pro-slavery mob. You’ll also find links to related sources found within the Library of Congress website.

Genius of Universal Emancipation (Mount Pleasant, OH; Greenville, TN; Washington, DC; Baltimore, MD) 1821-1830.
Lundy’s antislavery newspaper in which William Lloyd Garrison served as assistant editor from 1829-1830 in Baltimore.

National Enquirer, and Constitutional Advocate of Universal Liberty (New York, NY) 1836-1838.
Benjamin Lundy published this paper for the Eastern District Executive Committee of the Anti-Slavery Society of Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania Freeman continues the title.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items relevant to Benjamin Lundy.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online documents, including those by or about Benjamin Lundy.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary sources from 1850 to 1877. Some materials pertaining to Benjamin Lundy are available. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

A Plan for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery in the United States, without Danger or Loss to the Citizens of the South
An 1825 pamphlet authored by Lundy. This digitized copy is provided by the Antislavery Literature Project.

The Portal to Texas History
The Portal contains the following two digitized items containing Benjamin Lundy’s opposition to the expansion of slavery into Texas:

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets by or about Benjamin Lundy.

May, Samuel J., Mumford, Thomas James, et al. Memoir of Samuel Joseph May.
Boston: Roberts Brothers, 1873.
May’s memoir published after his death in 1871.

Yacovone, Donald. Samuel Joseph May and the Dilemmas of the Liberal Persuasion, 1797-1871
Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1991.
This work is the most recent biography of Reverend May available to the public.

Documenting the American South
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries has created this website containing resources pertaining to the South. Included in this collection is a memorial pamphlet titled Samuel Joseph May . . . published by the Syracuse Journal Office in 1871.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items by and about Samuel J. May.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets. This resource includes a brief biography of May and pamphlets authored by May.

Samuel J May - New York History Net
Another brief biography of Reverend Samuel J. May. This web page is maintained by New York History Net.

Samuel Joseph May
Provides an overview of May’s life and involvement in antislavery societies. Dennis Landis authored this biography for the Dictionary of Unitarian and Universalist Biography. Start with this website first if you are looking for a good introduction to the Reverend May.

UMass Amherst DuBois Library - SCUA - Antislavery Pamphlets
This digital library contains pamphlets that demonstrate the various points of view New Englanders had regarding slavery from the Revolution to the Civil War. Included in this collection is Samuel J. May’s A Discourse on Slavery in the United States, Delivered in Brooklyn [CT], July 3, 1831. This excellent resource is maintained by the University of Amherst DuBois Library Special Collections and University Archives [SCUA].

The Antislavery Literature Project
This digital archive contains historical and contemporary accounts of slavery, including several by and about Theodore Parker. Parker’s The Effect of Slavery on the American People and The Slave Power are available to read. This site is maintained by the English Department of Arizona State University and the EServer at Iowa State University’s English Department.

Carr, Glynis. Index to The Liberty Bell.
The Liberty Bell is an American Anti-Slavery publication containing essays and poetry from various abolitionists, including Theodore Parker.

From Slavery to Freedom: The African-American Pamphlet Collection
This digital collection from the Library of Congress complements the African American Perspectives listed above and contains primary resources pertaining to slavery and antislavery. Below are two titles authored by Parker:
The present aspect of slavery in America and the immediate duty of the North. . .
The relation of slavery to a republican form of government. . .

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items by and about Parker.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online antislavery documents, including those by Theodore Parker.

The American Experience - John Brown’s Holy War
This website is a companion to the PBS American Experience film of the same name. This site provides a good overview of John Brown by providing brief info about his life and other personalities tied to Brown (Parker being one of the Secret Six), maps, a timeline, and a teacher’s guide.

The Liberator Files
This site maintained by Horace Sheldon contains articles from The Liberator, including several authored by or about Theodore Parker.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary and secondary sources from 1850 to 1877. A good amount of material pertaining to antislavery sentiment, fugitive slaves, and the Civil War can be found in this site, including material about Theodore Parker. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time, but also contains the War of the Rebellion series. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets, including many by Theodore Parker.

Slaves and the Courts 1740-1860
This digital library is part of the Library of Congress American Memory project. The collection contains full texts of books and pamphlets on the legal issues of slavery. Theodore Parker’s involvement in the Anthony Burns Affair can be read in the following:
The Trial of Theodore Parker
Boston Slave Riot, and Trial of Anthony Burns
The New Crime against Humanity . . .

Theodore Parker
Provides an overview of Parker’s life. Dean Grodzins authored this biography for the Dictionary of Unitarian and Universalist Biography. Start with this website first for a good intro to Parker.

Bartlett, Irving H. Wendell Phillips, Brahmin Radical.
Boston: Beacon Press, 1961.
One may find the language used in this book to be dated and politically incorrect. Despite this flaw, Bartlett provides a decent introduction to Wendell Phillips.

The Antislavery Literature Project
This digital archive contains historical and contemporary accounts of slavery. One will find a wealth of material regarding slavery in the United States, including items authored by Phillips. This site is maintained by the English Department of Arizona State University and the EServer at Iowa State University’s English Department.

Argument of Wendell Phillips, Esq., before the Committee on Federal Relations, (of the Massachusetts Legislature)
Wendell Phillips made the argument to get rid of Edward Greeley Loring as a probate judge due to his decision returning Anthony Burns to slavery. This item is part of the Library of Congress Slaves and the Courts, 1740-1860 digital collection.

... Can abolitionists vote or take office under the United States Constitution? ...
Phillips viewed the United States Constitution as a pro-slavery document which, as indicated in this 1844 speech, he did not support. This document is part of the African-American Pamphlet Collection of the Library of Congress.

Carr, Glynis. Index to The Liberty Bell.
The Liberty Bell is an American Anti-Slavery publication containing essays and poetry from various abolitionists, including Wendell Phillips.

CivilWar@Smithsonian
The CivilWar@Smithsonian website highlights Smithsonian items pertaining to Civil War history. This website provides some information about Wendell Phillips. Below are links to the site’s contents that cover Phillips:

The Immediate Issue: A Speech by Wendell Phillips. . .
This speech is part of the African-American Pamphlet Collection of the Library of Congress.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items by and about Phillips.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online documents by/about Wendell Phillips.

The Liberator Files
This site maintained by Horace Sheldon contains articles from The Liberator, including many by and about Wendell Phillips.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary and secondary sources from 1850 to 1877. Some items regarding Wendell Phillips are available within MOA. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time, but also contains the War of the Rebellion series. The University of Michigan version contains books/monographs, including Speeches, Lectures, and Letters.: By Wendell Phillips.

No slave hunting in the old Bay State: an appeal to the people and legislature of Massachusetts ...
Phillips delivered this 17 February 1859 speech slamming the Bay State for sending fugitive slaves back to their owners. The pamphlet containing extracts from this speech is part of the African-American Pamphlet Collection of the Library of Congress.

The philosophy of the abolition movement. By Wendell Phillips.
This title is a 27 January 1853 speech given by Phillips and is part of the African-American Pamphlet Collection of the Library of Congress.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets authored by Wendell Phillips.

Speech of Wendell Phillips
This page contains an 1854 speech by Phillips. The Gilder Lehrman Center maintains this site. Search this site for other Wendell Phillips materials.

Robertson, Stacey M. Parker Pillsbury: Radical Abolitionist, Male Feminist.
Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2000.
A scholarly account of Pillsbury’s life. You’ll need strong knowledge about the US antislavery movement and the Garrisonians before reading this book.

Herald of Freedom (Concord, NH) 1838-1846.
Pillsbury edited this newspaper from 1845-1846.

National Anti-Slavery Standard (New York, NY) 1840-1870.
Pillsbury edited this paper from 1865-1866.

Carr, Glynis. Index to The Liberty Bell.
The Liberty Bell is an American Anti-Slavery publication containing essays and poetry from various abolitionists, including Parker Pillsbury.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items by and about Parker Pillsbury.

Pillsbury, Parker. Acts of the Anti-Slavery Apostles.
Parker Pillsbury’s 1883 memoir available in Google Books.

Pillsbury Family Papers
This page provides brief biographical information and a description about the Pillsbury Family Papers. The Papers are part of the Colby-Sawyer College Archives.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets by Parker Pillsbury.

AAP Biography: Remond, C.L.
This brief biography of Remond contains some recommended sources for further information. This biography is part of the American Abolitionism Project.

The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed
A good starting point for locating information about people involved in the antislavery movement, including Charles Lenox Remond. Links to other resources/websites are also included.

Carr, Glynis. Index to The Liberty Bell.
The Liberty Bell is an American Anti-Slavery publication containing essays and poetry from various abolitionists, including Remond.

Documenting the American South
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries maintains this website containing resources pertaining to the South. Included in this collection are digitized books and pamphlets regarding slavery, the antislavery movement, runaway slaves, and the Underground Railroad. Some resources within this collection contain information about Charles Lenox Remond.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about Charles Lenox Remond.

The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed
A good starting point for locating information about Sarah Parker Remond. Links to other resources are also included.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about Remond.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets, such as The Negroes and Anglo-Africans as freedmen and soldiers by Sarah Remond.

Douglass, Frederick. Life and Times of Frederick Douglass.
Hartford, Conn.: Park Publishing Co., 1881. Various editions are available. See below for online texts.
The final autobiography of Frederick Douglass, includes mention of Ruggles.

Douglass, Frederick. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself
Boston: Anti-Slavery Office, 1845. Various editions are available. See below for online texts.
The first written work by Douglass about his life as a slave. Includes Ruggles’s role in Douglass’s life.

Hodges, Graham Russell Gao. David Ruggles : a radical black abolitionist and the Underground Railroad in New York City.
Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010.

The Mirror of Liberty. New-York: David Ruggles, July 1838-Aug 1840?

The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed
A good starting point for locating information about people involved in the antislavery movement, including David Ruggles. Links to other resources/websites are also included.

A conversation with Graham Russell Gao Hodges, author of David Ruggles: A Radical Black Abolitionist and the Underground Railroad in New York City
(University of North Carolina Press, March 2010).
Ruggles biographer Hodges provides a brief interview about the importance of Ruggles in the antislavery movement.

The David Ruggles Center
The Ruggles Center is an organization promoting the role of Florence Massachusetts in the Underground Railroad and the antislavery movement. Included is a brief biography about David Ruggles.

Documenting the American South
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries maintains this website containing resources pertaining to the South. Included in this collection are materials containing Ruggles’s role in the Underground Railroad.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about David Ruggles.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online antislavery documents, including one by Ruggles titled The “extinguisher” extinguished! or David M. Reese, M.D. “used up.” By David Ruggles, a man of color. Together with some remarks upon a late production, entitled “An address on slavery and against immediate emancipation with a plan of their being gradually emancipated and colonized in thirty-two years. By Heman Howlett.”.

Making of America - University of Michigan
This digital library contains scanned images of books/monographs published from 1850 to 1877. Some material pertaining to Ruggles may be found in this site.

New York City Underground Railroad - CSPAN Video Library
Eric Foner interviews Ruggles biographer Graham Russell Gao Hodges about his research and book about Ruggles and the Underground Railroad in New York City. This video available via the C-SPAN website.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets by or about David Ruggles and the New York Committee of Vigilance.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about Rush and his attitude towards slavery.

PBS Africans in America
In the Benjamin Rush page, you’ll find a brief biography and links to other pages within this resource relating to Rush and his antislavery beliefs.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets authored by Rush.

The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed
A good starting point for locating information about Dred Scott.

A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: US Congressional Documents and Debates 1774-1875
This Library of Congress website allows one to search Congressional documents for the years 1774-1875. This source is useful in locating opinions regarding Dred Scott.

Documenting the American South
This digital library of southern history includes opinions regarding Dred Scott.

Dred Scott - Library - MNHS.ORG
This page contains a summary of Dred Scott and a listing of resources available at the Minnesota Historical Society.

Dred Scott v. Sandford
A listing of recommended resources about the case made by the Library of Congress Digital Reference Section.

Dred Scott’s fight for freedom
Brief article about Dred Scott from the PBS website Africans in America.

From Slavery to Freedom: The African-American Pamphlet Collection
This digital collection from the Library of Congress contains various opinions about the Dred Scott decision.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Narrow your search to a specific topic about Dred Scott, or you will be overwhelmed by the search results.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to documents about Dred Scott.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary and secondary sources from 1850 to 1877, including items about Dred Scott. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

Missouri Digital Heritage - Missouri’s Dred Scott Case
A few pages of info about the Dred Scott case.

The Revised Dred Scott Case Collection
The Washington University Digital Gateway maintains this website containing records of the Dred Scott litigation that began in 1846 when Dred and Harriett Scott sued for their freedom. Their quest for freedom by legal means ended with the controversial 1858 Supreme Court decision. A Chronology and History of the Dred Scott Case are included, as are links to additional resources.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets about Scott.

A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: US Congressional Documents and Debates 1774-1875
This Library of Congress website allows one to search Congressional documents for the years 1774-1875. Use this resource to locate material pertaining to Seward’s antislavery record.

The Dangers of Extending Slavery; and, The Contest and the Crisis: Two Speeches of William H. Seward
Full text of the two speeches available from The Library of Congress African-American Pamphlet Collection.

Freedom in Kansas. Speech of William H. Seward, in the Senate of the United States, March 3, 1858.
Contains link to full-text of speech. This resource is part of Making of America Books.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Narrow your focus regarding William Seward before searching this site, or you will be overwhelmed by the search results.

The Irrepressible Conflict
Speech given by Seward in Rochester, New York 25 October 1858. This web page is maintained by New York History Net.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for speeches made by Seward.

The Seward House
The Seward House is the historic Auburn, New York home of William Henry Seward.

Speech of William H. Seward, for the immediate admission of Kansas into the Union. Senate of the United States, April 9, 1856.
Contains link to full-text of speech. This resource is part of Making of America Books.

William Henry Seward Papers
This website contains a brief biography of Seward and a listing of finding aids for the Papers housed at the University of Rochester Department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation.

William H. Seward. [The American Whig review. / Volume 11, Issue 30, June 1850]
Article covering Seward’s career up to 1850. This resource is part of Cornell University Making of America.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about Thomas Sims.

The Liberator Files
This site maintained by Horace Sheldon contains articles from The Liberator, including several regarding Thomas Sims.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets about Sims.

Trial of Thomas Sims
View the opening arguments, closing arguments, and final decision of the Sims Trial. This page is part of the Library of Congress Slaves and the Courts, 1740-1860 website.

From Slavery to Freedom: The African-American Pamphlet Collection
This digital collection from the Library of Congress contains primary resources pertaining to slavery and antislavery. Several items authored by Smith are available to view in full text.

Gerrit Smith Collection
This Wichita State University Libraries Special Collections site provides a finding aid for the Gerrit Smith Collection. A brief biography is also included.

Gerrit Smith Estate and Land Office
This page provides a brief bio about Gerrit Smith and his land holdings. The page is part of the National Park Service Aboard the Underground Railroad.

Gerrit Smith Virtual Museum
This digital museum provides a gateway to many online resources about Gerrit Smith. All are maintained by the New York History Net. The Museum provides links to biographies, a bibliography, and a portrait gallery.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items by and about Gerrit Smith.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online documents by/about Smith.

The Liberator Files
This site maintained by Horace Sheldon contains articles from The Liberator, including items by Gerrit Smith.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary and secondary sources from 1850 to 1877. A good amount of material pertaining to Smith are available within MOA. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time, but also contains the War of the Rebellion series. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs. Focus on the University of Michigan site.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets authored by Gerrit Smith.

SMITH, Gerrit - Biographical Information
This brief biography is part of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.

Syracuse University Library Special Collections Research Center
The Special Collections include The Gerrit Smith Broadside and Pamphlet Collection and The Gerrit Smith Papers.

Still, William. The underground rail road. A record of facts, authentic narratives, letters, &c., narrating the hardships, hair-breadth escapes, and death struggles of the slaves in their efforts for freedom, as related by themselves and others, or witnessed by the author; together with sketches of some of the largest stockholders, and most liberal aiders and advisers, of the road.
Various editions.
Published in 1872, Still’s account of his Underground Railroad activities and others. The 1872 edition is available to read online via The HathiTrust Digital Library.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about/by William Still.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online documents, including those by or about William Still.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. Included in this collection is William Still’s Brief narrative of the struggle for the rights of the colored people of Philadelphia in the city railway cars : and a defence of William Still, relating to his agency touching the passage of the late bill, andc. : read before a large public meeting, held in Liberty Hall, Lombard St. below Eighth, Apr. 8th, 1867.

Underground Railroad: the William Still Story
This 2012 PBS film may be viewed online. This website also offers Stories of Freedom, Locations important to Underground Railroad history, and middle school Classroom plans

William Still: An African-American Abolitionist
This site, hosted by Temple University Libraries, features background information and documents about William Still, with some information about his family. Contents include Classroom Resources, Maps, a Timeline, and other great resources. An excellent site for your William Still and Underground Railroad research.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about Lucy Stone.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online documents about Lucy Stone.

Lucy Stone
There’s a short biographical note about Stone in this page. Some comments from Alice Stone Blackwell about her mother Lucy Stone may also be found here. This page is part of the Electronic Oberlin Group’s Oberlin Through History website.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary and secondary sources from 1850 to 1877. Some materials about Lucy Stone are available. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

Stowe, Harriet Beecher. Uncle Tom’s Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly.
Various editions.
The 1852 fiction work that fueled antislavery sentiment in the United States.

The Antislavery Literature Project
This digital archive contains historical and contemporary accounts of slavery. One will find a wealth of material regarding slavery in the United States, including documents by or about Stowe. This site is maintained by the English Department of Arizona State University and the EServer at Iowa State University’s English Department.

Dred; A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp. In Two Volumes
Documenting the American South provides a full text version of this title originally published in 1856.

Harriet Beecher Stowe Center
This website promotes the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center in Hartford, CT. Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Life page contains biographical and genealogical information.

Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896)
Go to this page when you’re ready to dive into full text online resources of Stowe’s works.

Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin
You’ll find a full text online version of Uncle Tom’s Cabin plus additional resources pertaining to Harriet Beecher Stowe and nineteenth century life. This resource is part of American Studies at the University of Virginia.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about Harriet Beecher Stowe.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online documents, including those by or about Harriet Beecher Stowe.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary sources from 1850 to 1877. A good amount of material pertaining to Harriet Beecher Stowe can be found in this site, but not all will pertain to antislavery. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time, but also contains the War of the Rebellion series. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets by Harriet Beecher Stowe.

Donald, David Herbert. Charles Sumner. New York: Da Capo Press, 1996.
This book unites Donald’s Charles Sumner and the Coming of the Civil War and Charles Sumner and the Rights of Man into a single volume biography of Charles Sumner. Donald’s Charles Sumner is the authoritative biographical resource on the Senator.

A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: US Congressional Documents and Debates 1774-1875
This Library of Congress website allows one to search Congressional documents for the years 1774-1875. This source is useful in locating antislavery petitions to Congress and the actions of individual Senators, such as Charles Sumner, in regards to slavery.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Narrow your topic regarding Sumner before searching this site for materials.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online documents authored by or about Charles Sumner.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets authored by Charles Sumner.

SUMNER, Charles - Biographical Information
A brief biography of Sumner from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.

UMass Amherst DuBois Library - SCUA - Antislavery Pamphlets
This digital library contains pamphlets that demonstrate the various points of view New Englanders had regarding slavery from the Revolution to the Civil War. Several Sumner items may be found in this collection. This excellent resource is maintained by the University of Massachusetts Amherst DuBois Library Special Collections and University Archives [SCUA].

Amistad: The Federal Courts and the Challenge to Slavery
An excellent introduction to the Amistad case and Lewis Tappan’s involvement in the matter. You’ll find historical background information and documents related to the topic. This site was created and is maintained by the Federal Judicial Center, the education and research agency for the United States Federal Courts.

The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed
A good starting point for locating information about people involved in the antislavery movement, including some info about the Tappan brothers. Links to other resources/websites are also included.

Documenting the American South
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries maintains this website containing resources pertaining to the South. Included in this collection are digitized books and pamphlets regarding slavery, the antislavery movement, runaway slaves, the Underground Railroad, and some information about Arthur and Lewis Tappan.

From Slavery to Freedom: The African-American Pamphlet Collection
This digital collection from the Library of Congress contains primary resources pertaining to slavery and antislavery. Several pamphlets, including Lewis Tappan’s American Slavery and To the people of the United States, or, To such Americans as value their rights, and dare to maintain them are available to view in full text.

Gilder Lehrman Center Bibliography of Online Documents
This resource lists online primary sources pertaining to slavery. Included are speeches and correspondence by Arthur Tappan and Lewis Tappan.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items by and about Arthur and Lewis Tappan.

The History Box/Abolition Riots 1834-1836
This page provides a brief description of the July 4, 1834 Tappan Riot in New York City.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online documents by/about Arthur and Lewis Tappan.

The Liberator Files
This site maintained by Horace Sheldon contains articles from The Liberator, including some from/about the Tappan brothers.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary and secondary sources from 1850 to 1877. A good amount of material pertaining to the Tappans is available within MOA. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time, but also contains the War of the Rebellion series. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

NYPL Digital Gallery - Tappan, Lewis, 1788-1873
This search results found within the New York Public Library Digital Gallery for Lewis Tappan images.

Papers of Lewis Tappan
The Library of Congress has the original Lewis Tappan manuscript collection. Other libraries throughout the United States have a microfilm copy of the Papers of Lewis Tappan. Check WorldCat for a location near you. See the Billy Graham Center Archives Papers of Lewis Tappan - Collection 174 page for a good introduction to the collection.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets authored by Lewis Tappan.

Slaves and the Courts 1740-1860
This digital library is part of the Library of Congress American Memory project. The collection contains full texts of books and pamphlets on the legal issues of slavery. Included in this collection is Lewis Tappan’s The Fugitive slave bill : its history and unconstitutionality.

Who Made America? - Innovators - Lewis Tappan
This brief bio is from the PBS They Made America website.

Painter, Nell Irvin. Sojourner Truth: A Life, A Symbol. New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 1996.
This title provides a thoroughly researched biography of Sojourner Truth. Truth created very little in primary documents for historians to use, so Painter relies on other sources to give us Truth’s story. Chapter 26 provides a historiography. Coda: The Life of a Symbol is a chapter that describes the trouble we all have in separating myth from reality. Painter’s work corrects past misinformation about Truth. Read this book first before examining any other resources about Sojourner Truth.

The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed
A good starting point for locating information about Sojourner Truth. Links to other resources/websites are also included.

CivilWar@Smithsonian
The CivilWar@Smithsonian website highlights Smithsonian items pertaining to Civil War history. This website briefly covers Truth’s involvement in the abolition movement. Below is a link to a photograph of Truth:

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about Sojourner Truth.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online resources, such as The Narrative of Sojourner Truth and other items about Sojourner Truth.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary and secondary sources from 1850 to 1877. Some items about Sojourner Truth are available within MOA. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets about Sojourner Truth.

Larson, Kate Clifford. Bound for the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman Portrait of an American Hero.
New York: Ballantine Books, 2004.
Larson narrates Tubman’s story very well. This book provides maps, a family tree, a chronology, and a well-documented listing of endnotes. Start with this book first before reading other available titles.

The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed
A good starting point for locating information about people involved in antislavery/underground railroad, including Harriet Tubman.

Documenting the American South
This extensive digital archive of southern history contains text, images, and audio files. The University Library of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill maintains this site. Below are Harriet Tubman resources available from Documenting the American South:

Harriet Tubman
A brief biography of Harriet Tubman available through the PBS Africans in America website. Included in the site is a Portrait of Harriet Tubman and Incident in Troy New York.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about Harriet Tubman.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary sources from 1850 to 1877. A good amount of material pertaining to antislavery sentiment, fugitive slaves, and the Civil War can be found in this site. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time, containing a few articles mentioning Harriet Tubman.

The National Archives and Records Administration
The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) contains various documents pertaining to slavery. Their website includes resources pertaining to Harriet Tubman.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets about Tubman.

The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed
A good starting point for locating information about Nat Turner.

Documenting the American South
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries has created this website containing resources pertaining to the South. Included in this collection are the following Nat Turner materials:

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about Nat Turner.

Nat Turner’s Rebellion
A brief description of Nat Turner’s Rebellion available through the PBS Africans in America website. Check out the Related Entries links for other Nat Turner pages within this PBS website.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search this website for digitized pamphlets about Nat Turner.

The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed
A good starting point for locating information about people involved in the antislavery movement, including David Walker.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about David Walker.

Walker’s Appeal, in Four Articles; Together with a Preamble, to the Coloured Citizens of the World, but in Particular, and Very Expressly, to Those of the United States of America, Written in Boston, State of Massachusetts, September 28, 1829.
David Walker settled in Boston after escaping his enslaved life in Wilmington, North Carolina. After writing this pamphlet, Southern authorities demanded the Boston mayor to arrest Walker. The mayor refused. Unfortunately the mayor’s refusal did not spare Walker’s life. Walker died a “mysterious death” in 1830. This online version of the original pamphlet is part of the Documenting the American South project.

Miller, William Lee. Arguing about Slavery: The Great Battle in the United States Congress.
New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1996.
Note: Also published as Arguing about Slavery: John Quincy Adams and the Great Battle in the United States Congress.
This title focuses on Congressional activities relating to slavery from 1835-1845. The reception of antislavery petitions by Congress infuriated slave state politicians. They used a gag rule to prevent such petitions from being discussed in the House of Representatives. However, Representative John Quincy Adams led the effort to eliminate the gag rule. He succeeded, but it took great effort to defeat this measure. Other men assisting Adams are Joshua Giddings, William Slade, and Theodore Weld.

Arguing about Slavery provides not only a narrative of activities in Congress, but also provides background information about the antislavery movement in the 1830s and 1840s. The Appendix contains a brief chronology of congressional events related to the gag rule. The Notes are a bit skimpy. There is a bibliography providing sources related to the topic. Overall, Arguing about Slavery is a good source to consult.

Documenting the American South
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries maintains this website containing resources pertaining to the South. Included in this collection are digitized books and pamphlets regarding slavery. Included in this digital library is a brief bio of Weld by Monique Prince, and Weld’s American Slavery As It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses, written by Weld, Angelina Grimké, and Sarah Grimké.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items by and about Theodore Weld.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online antislavery books/documents, including those by and about Weld.

Resources for Studying the Lane Debates
This page provides links relating to the Lane Debates of February 1834 about slavery. Theodore Weld was a participant.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets authored by Theodore Weld.

WWHProject - Theodore Dwight Weld (1803-1895)
A brief bio of Weld by the Worcester Women’s History Project.

The Antislavery Literature Project
This digital archive contains historical and contemporary accounts of slavery. One will find antislavery poetry and writings by Whittier. This site is maintained by the English Department of Arizona State University and the EServer at Iowa State University’s English Department.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about John Greenleaf Whittier.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online documents by or about Whittier.

John Greenleaf Whittier
The John Greenleaf Whittier Homestead maintains this website. See the John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892) page for a brief biography and chronology. The Additional Resources page contains web links relevant to Whittier.

Haverhill Massachusetts Public Library Special Collections
A brief description of the Library’s John Greenleaf Whittier Collection holdings is provided.

The Liberator Files
This site maintained by Horace Sheldon contains articles from The Liberator, including a few by John Greenleaf Whittier.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary and secondary sources from 1850 to 1877. Some documents pertaining to Whittier are available. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
The Cornell University Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections maintains this excellent resource containing antislavery material. One may search or browse this website for digitized pamphlets by Whittier.

Bordewich, Fergus M. Bound for Canaan: The Underground Railroad and the War for the Soul of America.
New York: Amistad, 2005.
Bordewich provides a great narration about the major players of the Underground Railroad. The Selected Bibliography lists additional resources on the topic. A major flaw with this work is the lack of numbered endnotes. Bordewich does site his resources in the Notes section. Instead of using a numbered endnote, the author lists the page number, the text on that page where an endnote should be located, and the sources used. Footnote and endnote chasers may find this method annoying. Overall, Bound for Canaan is a good introduction to the workings and the major personalities involved in the Underground Railroad.

Foner, Eric. Gateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad.
New York : W.W. Norton & Co., 2015.
Foner focuses on the role vigilance committees played in assisting fugitive slaves to freedom. New York City is predominantly featured, but information about William Still’s efforts in Pennsylvania are provided. Upstate New York, Boston, New Bedford, Massachusetts, and Norfolk, Virginia are also featured. Foner provides a good historiography of the topic. He also provides details about fugitive slaves laws at the state and federal levels.

Gates, Henry Louis, and J.A. Rogers. 100 amazing facts about the Negro.
New York: Pantheon Books, 2017.
Joel A. Rogers published in 1934 100 Amazing Facts About the Negro With Complete Proof: A Short Cut to the World History of the Negro. Gates updated Roger’s work, presenting it as a question and answer format. Questions and answers about abolitionists, slavery, and The Underground Railroad are provided.

Sherburne, Michelle Arnosky. Slavery & the Underground Railroad in New Hampshire.
Charleston, S.C. : The History Press, 2016.
A quick read focusing on New Hampshire. Part IV covers the Granite State’s spur of the Underground Railroad.

Sinha, Manisha. The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition.
New Haven, CT. : Yale University Press, 2016.
The author meticulously researched the abolition cause in the United States from colonial times to The Civil War. Footnote chasers will find the Notes very useful in locating primary sources. Use the Index to locate information about The Underground Railroad.

Snodgrass, Mary Ellen. The Underground Railroad: An Encyclopedia of People, Places, and Operations.
Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 2008.
This two volume resource is a good first step in locating Underground Railroad information. The Introduction provides a three page overview of the Underground Railroad. The Table of Contents lists the entries, which are arranged alphabetically. The Index in Volume 2 serves as another means to locate information within this encyclopedia. Each entry ranges in length from one paragraph to a few pages. Sources are listed at the end of each entry which will serve to provide you with additional information about the topic. Most entries are about individuals involved in the Underground Railroad, but there are some entries that cover a topic related to the UR.

The Underground Railroad also provides many additional features. Several maps are available in Volume One. Volume Two contains a Chronology of the Underground Railroad. An excellent Primary Source Bibliography and Secondary Source Bibliography provide listings of additional resources to use in learning more about the UR. Appendix A contains genealogies of people involved in the Underground Railroad. Appendix B titled Passengers of the Underground Railroad lists “passengers,” their date of flight, the place they fled, and their destination. Appendix C: Underground Railroad Operatives by State and Province lists “conductors” of the UR, their “station”, and their religion. Overall, The Underground Railroad is a great resource to consult when beginning your research on the UR, or when you need a quick answer about the topic.

Still, William. The underground rail road. A record of facts, authentic narratives, letters, &c., narrating the hardships, hair-breadth escapes, and death struggles of the slaves in their efforts for freedom, as related by themselves and others, or witnessed by the author; together with sketches of some of the largest stockholders, and most liberal aiders and advisers, of the road.
Various editions.
Published in 1872, Still’s account of his Underground Railroad activities and others. The 1872 edition is available to read online via The HathiTrust Digital Library.

Von Frank, Albert J. The trials of Anthony Burns: Freedom and slavery in Emerson’s Boston.
Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998.

Black Heritage Trail - Museum of African American History Boston
This site is an online tour of the Black Heritage Trail of Boston. Included is information about John J. Smith, Lewis & Harriet Hayler, and John Coburn, all of whom assisted fugitive slaves.

Born in Slavery: Slave narratives from the Federal Writer’s Project, 1936-1938
The Library of Congress maintains this digital library containing recollections from former slaves about their lives. Narratives by Caroline Hammond, Ellen Cragin, and Adah Isabelle Suggs include first and second-hand accounts of escaping slavery.

The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed
A good starting point for locating information about people involved in the Underground Railroad.

Black-White Relations on Nantucket by Robert Johnson
This article originally appeared in the Spring 2002 issue of Historic Nantucket. The article is an overview of race relations in Nantucket and provides some information regarding the island’s antislavery movement and fugitive slaves.

Digital Public Library of America
A platform for archives, historical societies, libraries, museums, and other cultural institutions to share their content with Internet users. One may locate resources pertaining to The Underground Railroad, fugitive slaves, and/or individuals.

Documenting the American South
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries maintains this website containing resources pertaining to the South. Included in this collection are digitized books and pamphlets regarding slavery, the antislavery movement, runaway slaves, and the Underground Railroad.

Freedmen and Southern Society Project
The University of Maryland College Park History Department maintains this website containing several documents about fugitive slaves and a Chronology of Emancipation.

HathiTrust Digital Library
This digital repository makes available collections from numerous research libraries. Good for locating items about the Underground Railroad.

Historical Society of Pennsylvania
One may search the Society’s Online Catalogs for items pertaining to the Underground Railroad in Pennsylvania. Also see William Still Digital History Project, located in the Society’s Digital History Projects.

Internet Archive
This digital library provides a gateway to online books and documents.

Legacy of Slavery in Maryland
The Maryland State Archives maintains this resource providing information about the African American experience within the state. Information about the Underground Railroad within Maryland may be found by searching and browsing this site. A good starting point for those focusing on the Underground Railroad in Maryland.

Making of America (MOA) - Joint venture between Cornell University and the University of Michigan.
This digital library contains scanned images of US primary sources from 1850 to 1877. A good amount of material pertaining to antislavery sentiment, fugitive slaves, and the Civil War can be found in this site. The Cornell version focuses on popular journals of the time, but also contains the War of the Rebellion series. The University of Michigan version focuses on books/monographs.

North Country Underground Railroad Historical Association (NCUGRHA)
A good starting point for those interested in the Underground Railroad in the area between Albany New York and the Canadian border. The NCUGRHA site provides maps, history, and sources for additional information.

Slaves and the Courts 1740-1860
This digital library is part of the Library of Congress American Memory project. The collection contains full texts of books and pamphlets on the legal issues of slavery. Several fugitive slave cases are represented in this collection, as are John Quincy Adams, Anthony Burns, Charles G. Davis, William Lloyd Garrison, Edward Greely Loring, Wendell Phillips, Theodore Parker, and Jonathan Walker.

Underground Railroad: the William Still Story
This 2012 PBS film may be viewed online. This website also offers Stories of Freedom, Locations important to Underground Railroad history, and middle school Classroom plans

The Underground Railroad in Fall River by Kenneth Champlin, supplemented by the Fall River Historical Society
Learn about the Fall River Massachusetts Underground Railroad operations.

The Underground Railroad Project - Vermont Historical Society
Focusing on Vermont? Get started with this resource.

Virginia Runaways
This site contains runaway slave advertisements from Virginia newspapers from the 1730s to the 1770s. Thomas Costa, Professor of History at the University of Virginia’s College at Wise, created and maintains this resource.